The North Face Takes Note with #shemovesmountains Campaign

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We started She Went Wild with the sole aim of increasing the awareness of the achievements of women within the outdoor and adventure sport industry. Over the last couple of years we've seen the industry change and females becoming more recognised in the outdoor industry, We're glad to see that the fruits of many inspiring women and small organisations are beginning to take root on a global scale. This month The North Face launched their #shemovesmountains campaign and initiative, which aims to inspire and encourage girls and women to get outdoors. 

Women do amazing things. Really, seriously amazing things. And we do it as mothers, sisters, partners and friends. We're often the lynchpin of the family, the soft loving centre that holds everything together. But we're more. We're badass, mountain beating, bleeding, life giving, raw, beautiful mountains of energy, and we've been standing up ready to be counted for years. 

The Move Mountains campaign is rooted in empowering the next generation of explorers through partnerships with female-empowering organizations across the globe, sharing more stories of women in exploration, and a business commitment that impacts everything from representation in advertising campaigns to investment in product design.

“We know better than anyone that there are plenty of women out there who are already accomplishing incredible, inspiring things every day. Yet women and girls don’t see themselves represented as ‘explorers’,” said Tom Herbst, global vice president of marketing at The North Face. “We had a simple theory that if women and girls see more role models in exploration, it will create more female role models for future generations.”

While I find it a little offensive that after all this time, all it took was a "simple theory" to solve the great divide, it is a hugely positive thing that one of the great outdoor brand powerhouses have now joined the party.  Please, help yourself to a party pie and grab yourself a party hat... And no, there isn't a pink one. Yet they're right, one of our favourite slogans back when we started She Went Wild was "Inspired Women, Inspiring Women". What goes around comes around.

  Ashima Shiraishi  is an American rock climber. She started climbing at age six at  Rat Rock  in  Central Park  with her father. In a few years, she became one of the top boulderers and sport climbers in the world. Currently, she is widely considered to be  the  best teenage climber of either gender.

Ashima Shiraishi is an American rock climber. She started climbing at age six at Rat Rock in Central Park with her father. In a few years, she became one of the top boulderers and sport climbers in the world. Currently, she is widely considered to be the best teenage climber of either gender.


The cornerstone of Move Mountains is celebrating stories of women who are pushing boundaries, including The North Face athletes, alpinist Hilaree Nelson, climbing phenoms Ashima Shiraishi and Margo Hayes, and ultrarunner and activist Fernanda Maciel, in a series of short films narrated by fellow role models who admire them. The North Face is also featuring women who are role models beyond physical exploration, like women’s empowerment advocate America Ferrera, NASA scientist Tierra Guinn Fletcher, and musician and activist Madame Gandhi.

 Born in Brazil, now living in the Spanish Pyrenees, Fernanda is a highly respected endurance runner with a deep passion for protecting the environment and helping people in need. She is also determined to make a positive impact on the places she visits and likes her runs to carry strong social or environmental messages.

Born in Brazil, now living in the Spanish Pyrenees, Fernanda is a highly respected endurance runner with a deep passion for protecting the environment and helping people in need. She is also determined to make a positive impact on the places she visits and likes her runs to carry strong social or environmental messages.


Let's also not forget our incredible Aussie athletes. The likes of Angie Scarth-Johnson who had a chat with us at The Women's Adventure Expo last year, who incredibly at the age of 7 was the youngest person in the world to have beaten a grade 31 climb. She's now pounding down climbing routes around the world that many of us could only dream of, and with the small army of fans that accompanied her at the Expo last year, it's clear to see that she's already inspiring our younger generations.

 Local rock climber Angie Scarth-Johnson, 11, of the Blue Mountains, NSW has joined the Australia and New Zealand athlete team. Angie joins a strong team of local athletes as the first female climber, and certainly the youngest in all disciplines. She brings with her a passion for the outdoors and exploration, and a hope to inspire other young climbers to follow their dreams. 

Local rock climber Angie Scarth-Johnson, 11, of the Blue Mountains, NSW has joined the Australia and New Zealand athlete team. Angie joins a strong team of local athletes as the first female climber, and certainly the youngest in all disciplines. She brings with her a passion for the outdoors and exploration, and a hope to inspire other young climbers to follow their dreams. 

It's also a great thing that The North Face are reaching out beyond their remit of outdoor athletes too. Ultimately, we're just looking for an even playing field. Opportunities that are open to everyone, regardless of gender, ethnicity or sexual preference and placed firmly on skill, qualifications, dedication and enthusiasm.

In the effort to canvas the world with female explorers who are artists, athletes, educators and scientists, The North Face is making a commitment to equal representation of women in all advertising, social media and content moving forward. So, bring it on. Let's see The North Face lead by example, put their money where their mouth is and make this happen. Not just for a single hashtagged viral campaign, but forever. #shemovesmountains